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Selfie stick draws 90% of the viewer’s retina movements

Philadelphia, PA- The self-centered, (new) way of looking awkward while taking cutesy pictures of yourself or your group of friends at the top of the Eiffel Tower is all the rage. Selfie stick is the “hottest 2014/2015 holiday gift,” and people are embracing the long, extendable sticks as a way to never ask a stranger to take a photo of them ever again.

Researches from the Woodrow Institute of Social Sciences and Psychology have followed the phenomenon of selfie obsession and carefully studied if, indeed, the selfie takers get the desired results by using the selfie stick. The researches carefully analyzed the retina movements of two thousand participants who were shown pictures of people taking normal selfies and selfies with a stick. Surprisingly, 90% percent of the retina movements was first drawn to the stick itself, while blurring out the people who were holding it.

“The study provided us with interesting results,” told us Dr. Michael Berry, Chairman of the Woodrow Institute of Social Sciences and Psychology. “The individuals who are using selfie sticks as a way to optimize their self-portrayal are actually not getting the desired results; the study revealed that the sticks are actually a distraction to the eye […] what this means is that the viewer of the image spends more time looking at the actual stick; looking at its length, analyzing what materials it is made of and how the photographer is holding it rather than paying attention to the face/body/landscape that the photographer is trying to capture. In psychology we call this the “irrelevant yet relevant object of distraction” which bamboozles the brain.” When asked which tool would be best to take photos, Dr. Berry reverted back to “good ole fashioned days of asking the stranger to take multiple pictures so the person can choose the best one.”

Picture Credit

Inspired by The Onion

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