writing

The Old Owls’ Tales

Much like humans find wisdom and advice in the tales of the Old Wives, animals have the Old Owl’s knowledge which is widely shared when growing up. These tales were shared with me in the past few months in relaxed, yet intimate conversations with some very lovely owls in an undisclosed location.

Illustrations can be followed on my Instagram account leahrennes (and will be posted on WordPress sometimes too) and they are a celebration of a goal I set only in August of this year and I think have achieved quite well so far.

Before August, I would draw a cow and it looked more like an elephant. After doing the 30-day challenge by Mark Kistler “You can draw in 30 days” book, I not only realized drawing is something that can be taught (and don’t necessarily rely solely upon talent) but I also gained great confidence drawing. Suddenly, I can draw images for my stories which is something I though would be never able to do. Sure, I still need to practice but I have come a long way.

“The Old Owls’ Tales” are a result of the learning process and confidence I gained in the last two months. I hope you enjoy the illustrations and don’t be shy to follow.

And as a slight preview of today’s post- bring an umbrella if you see a worried bunny- according to the Owl tales, it means it is most likely to rain.

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Shinning bright on a Sunday!

It’s a great feeling when you have the writing fever. You stay up late, forget about eating, perhaps drinking coffee to stay up when your body is telling you to shut down.

I’ve been up since 5am and I can’t stop writing. I would like to share the cover of my new “Ginger’s missing glasses” children’s book. I am presenting the cover today, but it should be available on Amazon tomorrow. For FREE pre-orders, e-mail: leahrennes@gmail.com. DO IT! I want to hear your feedback!

I hope your Sunday is productive as well.

Love,

Leah

P.S: I also want to state that I have decided to do a so-called “LULU” pledge- meaning 50% of my profits will go to those in need. As you have seen in my log posts, I consider myself fortunate to have good opportunities in my life and I want to help those who do not.

“We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.”
Winston S. Churchill

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Male heros of children’s books

Children’s books are a special genre to write in. Not everyone understands the imagination children have or how they think. Or perhaps even what they find funny. Since I am writing my children’s book, I have- of course- done my due diligence to research the genre and not make any mistakes. Or, at least not as many mistakes.

What bothers me is that all this articles recommend using a male character. Little girls can better relate to male characters, while apparently vice-versa is impossible for them to do. I understand that probably a boy will not relate to a character of a ballerina (or will he?) but why can’t he relate to a bold, young girl who is seeking adventure? Or a young female scientist who is on the verge of a major breakthrough in dragon healing?

It is sad that even in children’s books there is sexism. By not including female characters or giving males main role, we are saying female characters belong in the background while the lead should be for men. It’s a disturbing thought! No one thinks about it so much, until actually faced with data (btw, here is a great article). Not all stories require a certain gender character, and sometimes one just wants to have a male character but the fact that writer’s are using male characters merely to increase sales is gross. Just gross. Our kids are the new generation of open-minded people, so start putting more female characters out there! Do it for the kids. If not for your sexist self.

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When it rains, it rains.

Whoever knows me well knows I am a SUCKER for sayings. They are kind of like an addiction of mine, as the wisdom (or sometimes stupidity) of our ancestors reveal in short, lovable sentences I can wittily use in conversations.

One that really gets me is the “when it rains, it pours.” I find it to be horrendously pessimistic and horrendously inaccurate. It is the generalization of the saying that gets me. There are so many rain types: light showers, baby drizzle, hail, ice pellets, or normal amounts of rain falling from the sky. Pouring is heavy rain, and it doesn’t happen most of the time. I guess it also depends on where you live. In Florida, where I live, it rains at roughly 5 o’clock in the afternoon every summer. Does it rain? Yes. Does it pour? No. It is merely a rainy storm passing by but it doesn’t mean that is raining heavily. Normally it is just a stupid shower.

What I’m trying to say is, every time I hear people use the saying “when it rains, it pours” I imagine them in a horrific thunderstorm, wet to the bones, shivering. But I feel like whoever came up with the saying was ridiculously dramatic and just hated rain. In real life, pouring down doesn’t happen that often, does it? Mostly the problems we see pour on us are really not that bad. In fact, they can be compared to some light showers and drizzle.

Which saying is your favorite/ least favorite? Why, why not? Leave a comment below!

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